Abandonware DOS title

Flight of the Amazon Queen

Flight of the Amazon Queen is an old DOS point & click adventure game developed by Interactive Binary Illusions in 1995 from an original idea by John Passfield, Steven Stamatiadis. Flight of the Amazon Queen can be enjoyed in single player mode from a side view perspective. It's available for download.
Flight of the Amazon Queen splash screen
Rating: 4.00
(14 votes)

Flight of the Amazon Queen downloads

Trouble running this game? Check out the F.A.Q.

Screenshots

All screenshots were taken by Abandonware DOS.
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YouTube video courtesy of Squakenet.com.

Additional info

Taking place in 1949, the game is a pastiche of adventure serials and pulp magazines of the time.

The game includes multiple allusions to the Indiana Jones games, for example images of their main character and his fear of snakes.

The DOS CD version contained a Mini-Game of sorts. The file Queen.1 (1.82MB, CRC: D72DCD56) is found in the INTERVIE folder in the CD-ROM's Root. The Mini-Game is a fully playable adventure game, where the main character tries to get an interview from the game's development team.

In March 2004, the game was released as free software and support for it was added to ScummVM, allowing it to be played on Linux, Mac OS X, Windows, and many other operating systems and consoles.

Facts, trivia and collector's notes are licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. These texts use material from this Wikipedia article.

Comments

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