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Theatre of War manual




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                          The Humble Guy's HumbleDox

                                   Presents

                    Theatre of War: Complete Game Manual


THEATRE OF WAR
         
Contents
         
DEVELOPMENT BACKGROUND ................ V
THE MAIN MENU ......................... VI
GAME SCREENS .......................... VII
PERSPECTIVE ........................... VII
WARP TILES ............................ VII
GAME SCREEN TILES ..................... VII
THEATRE OVERVIEW MAP .................. VII
POSITION CRYSTALS ..................... VII
WARRIOR TILES ......................... VIII
POWER BARS ............................ VIII
CURRENT WARRIOR IMAGE ................. VIII
ACTION TILES .......................... VIII
OVERHEAD .............................. VIII
ZOOM TILES ............................ VIII
STATUS SCREEN ......................... IX
GENERAL INFORMATION ................... X
SCENARIOS AND BOARDS .................. X
WARRIORS .............................. X
SUPPLY LINES .......................... X
MEDIEVAL SET .......................... XI
WARRIORS .............................. XI
EMPEROR (1) ........................... XI
PAWN (7) .............................. XI
SWORDSMAN (2) ......................... XI
ARCHER (4) ............................ XII
CHARIOT (1 ) .......................... XII
CATAPULT (1 ) ......................... XII
ACTIONS ............................... XII
MOVE .................................. XII
REST .................................. XIII
SHIELD ................................ XIII
HOLD .................................. XIII
INSPIRE ............................... XIV
BUILD ................................. XIV
DESTROY ............................... XIV
RETREAT ............................... XIV
OFFENSIVE/DEFENSIVE ................... XIV
THROW ................................. XV
SEEK .................................. XV
PATROL ................................ XV
ASSASSINATE ........................... XV
LAUNCH ................................ XVI
HIBERNATE ............................. XVI
PREPARE ............................... XVI
RESIGN ................................ XVI
GREAT WAR SET ......................... XVII
WARRIORS .............................. XVII
GENERAL (1) ........................... XVII
SOLDIER (7) ........................... XVII
SUPPLY TENT (2) ....................... XVII
GATLING GUN (3) ....................... XVIII
TANK (2) .............................. XVIII
CANNON (1) ............................ XVIII
ACTIONS ............................... XVIII
MOVE .................................. XIX
INSPIRE ............................... XIX
SHIELD ................................ XIX
REST .................................. XIX
ENTRENCH .............................. XIX
LAY MINE .............................. XX
SWEEP MINE ............................ XX
SHOOT ................................. XX
DEFEND ................................ XXI
RETREAT ............................... XXI
RESIGN ................................ XXI
CONTEMPORARY SET ...................... XXI
WARRIORS .............................. XXI
BASE (l)............................... XXII
TANK (5) .............................. XXII
RADAR (2) ............................. XXII
MISSILE LAUNCHER (4) .................. XXII
FIGHTER (3) ........................... XXII
BOMBER (1) ............................ XXII
ACTIONS ............................... XXIII
MOVE .................................. XXIII
REST .................................. XXIII
RESIGN ................................ XXIII
SHOOT ................................. XXIV
BUILD ................................. XXIV
DESTROY ............................... XXIV
RADAR ON/OFF .......................... XXIV
SCRAMBLE .............................. XXV
AUTO FIRE ............................. XXV
ESCORT ................................ XXV
HUNT .................................. XXV
BOMB .................................. XXV
MULTI-PLAYER GAMES .................... XXVI
SAME MACHINE .......................... XXVI
SERIAL CONNECTION ..................... XXVI
SAVING ................................ XXVII
RESTORING ............................. XXVII
SHARING ............................... XXVII
KEYBOARD EQUIVALENTS .................. XXIX
TECHNICAL SUPPORT ..................... XXX
COPYRIGHT NOTICE ...................... XXX
WARNING ............................... XXX
NOTICE ................................ XXXI
         
Development Background
         
Theatre of War is a product of vision. So much so that it was not 
until a few months before its release those people credited with 
marketing, distributing, and selling Theatre of War were able to 
fully understand what we had been crafting for so many months. It's 
still a bit amazing that Theatre of War ever reached completion, but 
Tom had faith in Rick's dream and in my understanding of that dream, 
even though he had a hard time describing it to our distributor and 
the retail channel. 

Nor were marketing issues our only challenge; Super VGA is still an 
undefined entity, with no hardware standards and the VESA software 
standard only marginally embraced. We hope to have solved most 
problems for you, our users. Oh, we know that some of you will still 
have problems. That's to be expected, especially when pushing the 
technological edge. 
         
As Theatre of War nears completion, there is still worry that the 
market may not understand what Theatre of War is; worry over 
problems with the multitude of video cards to be supported; and 
hope. Hope that you, the consumer, will enjoy this product enough to 
make our efforts pay off so we may bring you more innovative 
entertainment software.

For the innovation, sweat, long days, countless uploads, and sight, 
thanks must be given to everyone at Artech.

Lane Roathe

The Main Menu
         
The first part of the main menu consists of three buttons. 'Play' 
will lead directly to the game. 'Options' allows you re-configure 
the game for your machine. 'About' gives information on the people 
behind Theatre of War. 

The second part of the main menu lets you select how you will be 
playing the game, including the warrior set to use, if you will be 
playing the computer or another player and the scenario or board to 
play. 

Each section of the options screen displays a list of the items 
available, with the current selection depressed, and a scroll bar 
(two arrows with a vertical bar between them) which can be used to 
display items not currently displayed in the item list. 

The first section allows you to select which set of warriors to use 
for the game. Selecting the different sets will cause the 
scenario/board listing to update for the selected set. 

Theatre of War includes the following warrior sets: 

1 ) Medieval 

Hand to hand, Archers, and Catapults 

2) The Great War 

Gatling Guns, Tanks, and Cannon 

3) Contemporary 

Stealth, Radar, Aircraft, and Missiles 

The middle section is used to let Theatre of War know if you will be 
playing against a scenario or another player. Against another 
player, you may play on the same machine or over a. i.s. serial or 
modem connection (refer to the 'Multi-Player' section for specific 
information). 

The third section displays either the scenarios or boards for the 
current warrior set, depending on if you are playing against the 
computer or another player. Scenarios are played by the computer, 
and board setups are used to play another player. 

The scenario/board display also lists any saved games you 
have for the current warrior set. Saved scenarios are listed with 
the scenarios, saved boards with the boards. To restart a saved 
game, just select it from the list. 

There are several scenarios and boards for use with each warrior 
set, to see the entire list be sure to scroll using the arrows (the 
'scroll bar') to the right of the list. 

For two player games on a single machine, you can also change the 
amount of time each player has per turn. The default is 60 seconds 
and can be changed as desired using the arrows to either side of the 
display at the bottom of the screen. 

Clicking the 'Options' button displays a screen with several buttons 
on it which allow you to change the way Theatre of War is played. 
You can select the way the board is drawn, change the default 
settings for two player games, and turn sound effects on or off. 
Turning the sound off will help if you are running low on memory. 

Once you have made your selections, begin your game by clicking the 
PLAY button, or pressing 'Enter'. 

To exit back to the dos prompt, click the DOS button, or press the 
'Esc' key. 

Game Screens 

Theatre of War is played using three different game screens. The 
perspective and overhead views represent different views of the 
theatre from which the game can be played. The status screen gives 
information about your and your enemy's warriors. 

PERSPECTIVE           

This is the main Theatre of War screen. In the centre is the current 
theatre view--a nine-square by nine-square section of the complete 
theatre viewed in perspective. 

Each square on the board has its own set of properties and affects 
the individual warriors differently. Each warrior set has its unique 
set of squares which are explained in the introduction for that set. 

NOTE: Some warriors have the ability to change the properties of the 
playing squares. Details are contained within the warrior action 
descriptions of each set. 

All of the options you'll need to fight the battle are located on 
the screen surrounding the battlefield. Clockwise, beginning in the 
upper left corner: 

Warp Tiles 

These tiles enable you to change the speed that _ time passes. Warp 
1 is normal time, warp 2 is twice the normal speed, and so on. 

Game Screen Tiles 

Three tiles in the upper right corner of the screen control the 
current view of the player. The top tile switches to the Status 
Screen, the second tile switches to the overhead view, and the third 
tile centres the battlefield around your currently selected warrior. 

Theatre Overview Map 

Immediately below the lower right corner of the current battlefield 
view is the overview map. The warriors of the two powers are 
represented by different coloured dots, and the currently selected 
warrior is brighter than all the others. The lighter shaded portion 
of the map represents the section of the battlefield that the player 
is able to see on screen at the moment. 

NOTE: You can quickly change the battle field view by clicking on 
the map where you wish to be viewing. 

Position Crystals 

Four crystals located on the front of the map box let you move the 
section of the battlefield that is being viewed on screen. Click 
once on a crystal to shift the view one square north, ~ south, east, 
or west. 

NOTE: the arrow keys perform the same operation. 

Warrlor Tiles 

Across the bottom of the screen are 16 tiles--one for each of your 
warriors. When a warrior is destroyed, its warrior tile becomes 
inactive. Select a warrior either by clicking on its tile, on the 
warrior itself in the current battlefield view, or by pressing the 
appropriate key. 

Power Bars 

To the left of the Battlefield Map are two vertical bars. The left 
bar represents the current warrior's strength; the right bar 
represents the current warrior's health. When the warrior has all of 
its strength and health, both bars are fully dark. As a warrior 
loses its strength or health, the dark shading drops, leaving some 
or all of the top portion transparent. Warriors without strength are 
unable to move or perform other actions, including attacking or 
defending. Any warrior losing all its health is removed from play. 

Current Warrior Image 

In the lower centre of the screen to the left of the Power Bars is a 
large image of the currently selected warrior. This tells you which 
warrior can be given an order at the moment. Also, in a two-player 
game the colour of the image tells you whose turn it is. 

Actlon Tlles 

Immediately below the lower left corner of the bafflefield view, to 
the left of the Current Warrior Image, are the most important tiles 
on the screen. These six tiles control the actions of the currently 
selected warrior. 

NOTE: Because each type of warrior has different actions, the Action 
Tiles change according to which warrior is currently selected. Each 
warrior's possible actions are described in the Action section for 
its warrior set. 

OVERHEAD             

The controls available here are almost identical to those in the 
front view, except that there are no Battlefield Map, Current 
Warrior Image, or Power Bars. Instead, added to the other controls 
are two zooming tiles. 

Zoom Tiles 

To the right of the current battlefield view, just below centre in 
the margin, are the Zoom/Unzoom tiles. Click the upper tile to zoom 
in (letting you see less area, but in more detail). Click in the 
lower tile to zoom out (letting you see more play area, but in less 
detail). 

NOTE: Zooming out will expand the view until all of either the 
horizontal or vertical squares are displayed. Thus if a board is not 
square, even at the furthest zoom level you may need to scroll to 
see the entire board. 

STATUS SCREEN        

This screen lets you see the strength and health levels of your and 
your enemy's warriors at a glance. Each warrior is represented by 
its image and two small Power Bars (see Theatre Overview Map above). 
If a warrior has been destroyed, its image will not be shown. 

Warriors currently engaged in battle or performing an action are 
shown animated in their windows on the status screen. This is the 
quickest way to get an overall situation report on your warriors. 

You can switch between viewing your warriors and your enemy's 
warriors by pressing the 'U' key. 

The warrior selection tiles are located across the bottom of the 
screen so that you can select a warrior before exiting. The selected 
warrior's tile is highlighted. 

General Information 

Like traditional board games, Theatre of War involves a board and 
playing pieces, referred to as warriors. Unlike traditional board 
games, the warriors in Theatre of War do not have specific moves, 
but rather 'actions' that they may perform. Additionally, the board 
squares can be changed by warriors and the board is not limited to a 
fixed size or arrangement. Finally, action in Theatre of War is not 
based on turns, but rather real-time, meaning that your opponent is 
moving his warriors at the same time you are! 

SCENARIOS AND BOARDS 

There are two types of game setups in Theatre of War. Scenarios are 
designed for one player, and consist of a board, an arrangement of 
warriors, and a computer opponent. Boards are designed for two 
players, and consist of a board layout and a warrior arrangement. 

Each scenario or board has all or part of a set of warriors present. 
There is no predetermined placement for the warriors, nor is the 
board layout predetermined. Each board or scenario has been designed 
with a different challenge in mind. Study of the board layout and 
warrior placement at the beginning of a game will help in planning a 
winning strategy. 

WARRIORS 

Each set of warriors in Theatre of War contains six different types 
of warriors, arranged into a set of sixteen. Some are more obviously 
powerful, but all have their uses in the advancement of a successful 
campaign. 

Warriors without strength are unable to move or perform other 
actions, including attacking or defending. Any warrior losing all 
its health is removed from play. 

Straight line paths are rarely used by warriors moving from one 
square to another. Instead, each warrior determines the quickest 
route to the destination square. The terrain of intervening squares 
and the presence of enemy warriors can cause the moving warrior to 
take an indirect path in reaching its destination square. 

Whenever a warrior shoots a projectile, the projectile will try to 
hit an enemy warrior. If an enemy warrior and friendly warrior 
occupy the same square, the enemy warrior will take damage. However, 
if only a friendly warrior is present in the square, then that 
warrior will take damage. 

SUPPLY LINES 

Supply lines are used by all warrior sets as a basis for resting, 
re-supplying, and healing warriors. A supply line can be attached 
either directly or indirectly. A Warrior is directly attached if it 
is in a square adjacent to the supplier, and indirectly attached if 
it is in a horizontal, vertical, or diagonal path from the 
supplier's square. Indirect attachment also requires that there be 
no empty or enemy held squares between the supplier and the warrior 
requesting supply. Each warrior set has it's own rules and special 
cases for supply and attachment. Refer to each set's introduction 
for specifics. 

Medieval Set 

The Medieval Set is based upon hand to hand combat with only two 
warriors capable of attacking enemy warriors at a distance, the 
Archer and the Catapult. The object is to take your opponent's 
Emperor. 

There are three speeds of ground squares, slow, medium, and fast. 
Pawns are able to change the speed of a square. All warriors are 
effected by a square's speed. 

WARRIORS 

Each description below includes a summary of the warrior's 
characteristics. Immediately following the title of each warrior is 
a list of actions available to that warrior. Actions are initiated 
by selecting the warrior's Action Tiles, and are explained in the 
Actions section. 

Warriors recover strength, health and supplies from the Emperor. The 
Pawn may recover anywhere on the board, but the rest of the warriors 
must be connected to the Emperor via a supply line. 

Emperor (1) 
Actions: Move, Inspire, Shield, Rest, Resign 
Although the Emperor is your most important warrior, it is also the 
second-weakest. It can only kill a Pawn in a one-to-one battle. If 
the Emperor dies, you lose. The Emperor may resign a game. 

The Shield action is different for the Emperor. When active, all 
attached warriors will be protected. This causes the protected 
warriors to take half the damage they normally would during combat. 
This drains strength for the Ernperor. 

Pawn (7) 
Actions: Move, Build, Destroy, Rest, Retreat 
Even though it is the weakest warrior on the board (anything can 
kill it in a one-to-one battle), the Pawn is also the warrior with 
the most options. Its most important option is the ability to 
operate in either attack or defensive mode. Each mode affects the 
operation of the other options. For exarnple, a Pawn in defensive 
mode will take a little more time to perform an action, take less 
damage if attacked, and do less damage if it attacks. 

Swordsman (2) 
Actions: Move, Defend, Hold, Rest 
The Swordsman is a powerful fighting warrior. Its speciality is 
hand-to-hand combat, and it does this well. 

Archer (4) 
Actions: Move, Throw, Defend, Rest, Hold 
The Archer can throw a projectile at an enemy in the distance, 
inflicting damage to the target if the projectile hits. In hand-to- 
hand combat it is fairly efficient, but not at the level of a 
Swordsman. Care must be taken to keep Archers from being killed off 
too quickly. Archers hold a limited number of projectiles. 

Chariot (1 ) 
Actions: Move, Seek, Patrol, Rest, Assassinate 
The Chariot is the fastest warrior on the battlefield and has plenty 
of fighting power and options. It can patrol a certain area of the 
board, or be sent to attack the closest warrior or to attempt to 
assassinate the enemy Emperor. 

Catapult (1) 
Actions: Move, Launch, Rest, Hibernate, Prepare 
The Catapult is the most powerful warrior on the battlefield. It can 
destroy anything in a one-on-one battle and a single one of its 
projectiles can kill an enemy warriors at quite a distance. It is 
also rather slow and therefore an easy target for the enemy. The 
Catapult holds a limited number of projectiles. 

Actions 

To have a warrior perform an action: 

1) Select the warrior by clicking the mouse pointer on the warrior 
in any of the following locations: 

 Current battlefield view (front or overhead views) 
 Status screen 
 Warrior tile (at the bottom of every screen) 

2) Click the mouse pointer on the appropriate action tile (Front and 
Overhead views only). 

3) If necessary for the specific action, move the highlighted box 
around on the battlefield and locate the target or destination for 
the warrior's action using the mouse or 'Alt' plus the arrow keys. 

4) Click the left mouse button or press 'Enter' to select the 
highlighted target or destination square. 

NOTE: If you choose an action that requires selection of a 
highlighted square, but you then change your mind and wish to choose 
a different warrior or action, click the right mouse button to exit 
the process and begin again. 

MOVE 
Warriors: All 
This action moves the warrior to a new square. When a warrior is 
moving it will not attack enemy warriors located near its course of 
travel, and will defend itself poorly. Different warriors move at 
different speeds and expend different amounts of strength in moving. 

To move a selected warrior: 

1) Click the Move action tile; a highlight box is displayed on the 
battlefield. 

2) Move the box until it highlights the desired square. 

3) Press the left mouse button, or press 'Enter'. 

NOTE: If an enemy warrior is located in the new square, your warrior 
will attack upon arrival. 

NOTE: Warriors do not move toward their destinations in a straight 
line. They move along the fastest path available. Remember that the 
lighter squares are the fastest to move over, medium squares are a 
little bit slower, and the darkest squares are very slow. 

REST 
Warriors: All 
This action directs a warrior to stop what it is currently doing and 
enter rest and recovery mode. When a warrior is in Rest mode its 
strength and health levels will return to maximum. 

Only Pawns and Emperors rest on their current square (or on the next 
square they enter). All other warriors must be located in a square 
adjacent to the Emperor before stopping and resting. If such a 
warrior has the strength to return to the Emperor, it will do so 
automatically before resting. Otherwise, you will have to bring the 
Emperor to the exhausted warrior to begin its recovery! 

NOTE: A warrior in rest mode may only exit the mode when its maximum 
strength and health have returned. While in rest mode the warrior 
cannot attack the enemy, and will not defend itself well if 
attacked. Beware! This means that you have no control over a warrior 
in rest mode. A warrior in rest mode is easy prey for the enemy! 

SHIELD 
Warriors: Emperor, Swordsman, Archer 
This action puts the warrior into a defensive mode. The warrior will 
stop or stay where it is and, if forced into battle, will defend 
itself a little better than it normally would. Since its efforts are 
primarily defensive it does not inflict quite as much damage during 
combat. 

The Shield action is different for the Emperor. When active, all 
warriors attached to the Emperor will be protected. This causes the 
protected warriors to take half the damage they normally would 
during combat. This drains strength of the Emperor. 

HOLD 
Warriors: Archer, Swordsman 
This action puts a warrior into guard mode. An Archer ordered to 
Hold will throw projectiles at all enemy warriors within its range. 
A Swordsman will seek out the closest enemy warrior and engage it in 
battle. 

INSPIRE 
Warriors: Emperor only 
Inspire causes your Emperor to stop moving and give strength and 
health to all friendly non-Pawn warriors. To benefit from an 
Emperor's inspiration, warriors must be idle, and must be in a 
supply line to the Emperor. 

BUILD 
Warriors: Pawn only 
Build upgrades the terrain of a square to a faster surface, 
improving the speed at which your warriors may move through. If the 
square has a dark, slow surface, it will be upgraded to medium. If 
the square has a medium surface it will be upgraded to a light, fast 
surface. If the tile is already fast, it will not change. 

To upgrade the surface of a square: 

1 ) Click the Build action tile; a highlight box is displayed on the 
battlefield. 

2) Move the box until it highlights the desired square. 

3) Press the left mouse button, or press 'Enter'. 

DESTROY 
Warriors: Pawn only 
Destroy is exactly the opposite of Build (please see above). Instead 
of upgrading a square, the Pawn will degrade the square to a slower 
surface, if possible. This is used to slow down the advance of enemy 
warriors. 

RETREAT 
Warriors: Pawn only 
This action sends a Pawn either to the side of the Emperor, or to a 
selected square. 

NOTE: Unless you specify a destination first, Retreat will always 
send the selected Pawn to the Emperor. 

OFFENSIVE/DEFENSIVE 
Warriors: Pawn only 
This action toggles between offensive and defensive modes for a 
selected Pawn. A Pawn in defensive mode carries a shield, while a 
Pawn in an offensive mode carries a sword. In general, a Pawn in 
defensive mode is slower and does less damage in battle, but 
receives less damage in battle. 

THROW 
Warriors: Archer only 
This action directs an Archer to throw a projectile at the targeted 
enemy warrior. Projectiles inflict minimal damage to the target, and 
several hits are required to destroy an enemy warrlor. 

To target and throw for a selected Archer: 

1 ) Click the Throw action tile; a highlight box is displayed on the 
battlefield. 

2) Move the box until it highlights the desired square. 

3) Press the left mouse button, or press 'Enter'. 

When an Archer has used up all of its projectiles, it must enter 
Rest mode adjacent to the Emperor to reload. If an Archer is ordered 
to throw, but has no projectiles, nothing will happen. 

SEEK 
Warriors: Chariot only 
This action directs the Chariot to seek out and attack the closest 
enemy warrior. The Chariot will continue performing this action 
until given a new action, its energy is exhausted or it is destroyed 
in battle. 

PATROL 
Warriors: Chariot only 
This action directs the Chariot to patrol back and forth between its 
current square and a specific destination square. Enemy warriors 
that enter within this patrol will be attacked by the Chariot. 

To set a Chariot on patrol: 

1) Click the Patrol action tile; a highlight box is displayed on the 
battlefield. 

2) Move the box until it highlights the desired square. 

3) Press the left mouse button, or press 'Enter'. 

ASSASSINATE 
Warriors: Chariot only 
This action directs the Chariot to locate and attack the enemy 
Emperor. During its search the Chariot will try to avoid enemy 
warriors, concentrating its efforts on destroying the enemy Emperor. 

NOTE: When fighting in this mode the Chariot will do more damage 
than in normal battle, but is also more easily damaged. 

LAUNCH 
Warriors: Catapult only 
This action directs the Catapult to launch a projectile at a 
targeted enemy warrior. A single hit from the catapult can be enough 
to destroy an enemy warrior! 

To target a launch for the selected Catapult: 

1 ) Click the Launch action tile; a highlight box is displayed on 
the battlefield. 

2) Move the box until it highlights the desired target. 

3) Press the left mouse button, or press 'Enter'. 

NOTE: When a Catapult has used up all of its projectiles, it must 
enter Rest mode adjacent to the Emperor to reload. If a Catapult is 
ordered to launch, but has no projectiles, nothing will happen. 

HIBERNATE 
Warriors: Catapult only 
This action directs the Catapult to stop all actions and go into 
full defensive mode. While hibernating, the Catapult cannot Move or 
Launch, but at the same time cannot be damaged in any way. 

PREPARE 
Warriors: Catapult only 
This action brings a Catapult out of hibernation mode. 
Unfortunately, it takes the Catapult a fairly long time to get out 
of hibernation; while doing so it cannot fight and is very 
vulnerable to attack. 

RESIGN 
Warriors: Emperor only 
This action surrenders and quits the game. You have a few seconds to 
cancel the Resign command before it takes effect. 

Great War Set 
This set uses warriors based on the technologies present during the 
Great War. There is still hand to hand combat; however, most 
warriors shoot projectiles at the enemy before engaging in hand to 
hand combat. The objective is to take your opponent's General. 

All squares have the same movement rate. Some tiles are now 
dangerous to enter, as they contain one or more mines. Whether laid 
by friendly or enemy warriors, mines are impartial as to whom they 
damage. 

WARRIORS 
Each description below includes a summary of the warrior's 
characteristics. Immediately following the title of each warrior is 
a list of actions available to that warrior. Actions are initiated 
by selecting the warrior's Action Tiles, and are explained in the 
Actions section. 

Warriors may be in a supply line with either the General or a Supply 
Tent in order to resupply. Supply Tents must be in a supply line 
with the General to fully resupply themselves, and the General must 
call for resupply in order to keep providing supply to all the other 
warriors. 

GENERAL (1) 
Actions: Move, Inspire, Shield, Rest, Resign 
Although the General is your most important warrior, it is also the 
second-weakest. It can only kill a Soldier in a one-to-one battle. 
If the General dies, you lose. Also, only the General can resign a 
game. When healing or re- supplying a warrior, the General should be 
resting in order to quickly recover the transferred health and 
supply. 

The General Rests on its current square. 

SOLDIER (7) 
Actions: Move, Mine, Rest, Retreat, Entrench 
Even though it is the weakest warrior on the board (anything can 
kill it in a one-to-one battle), the Soldier is also the warrior 
with the most options, including the ability to lay and sweep mines. 

SUPPLY TENT (2) 
Actions: Move, Rest, Entrench 
Supply Tents are important in their support of other warriors. They 
should be placed out of the way of battle as they are poor fighters. 
Health and supply is transferred from the Supply Tent to the resting 
warrior, so Supply Tents must themselves be rested often. 

An exhausted Supply Tent must be attached to the General to Rest and 
fully resupply. 

GATLING GUN (3) 
Actions: Move, Rest, Shoot, Defend, Retreat, Entrench 
The Gatling Gun is a short-range, slow moving weapon which fires 
projectiles at several squares simultaneously. Caution should be 
exercised in its use, for it may damage friendly warriors as well as 
enemy warriors! 

TANK (2) 
Actions: Move, Rest, Shoot, Defend, Retreat 
The Tank is a fast-moving armoured warrior which shoots powerful 
projectiles. Although it can't shoot as far as the cannon, it is 
invulnerable to small weapons fire. 

CANNON (1 ) 
Actions: Move, Rest, Shoot, Defend, Retreat Entrench 
The Cannon is a fairly quick-moving and powerful warrior and can 
fire projectiles long distances. Although it lacks the ability to 
target at shortrange, it can defend itself as well as a Soldier. 

ACTIONS 
Each action below is followed by a list of the warriors able to 
perform the action and a description of the action. To have a 
warrior perform an action: 

1)  Select the warrior by clicking the mouse pointer on the warrior 
in any of the following locations: 

 Current battlefield view (front or overhead views) 
 Status screen 
 Warrior tile (at the bottom of every screen) 

2) Click the mouse pointer on the appropriate action tile (Front and 
Overhead views only). 

3) If necessary for the specific action, move the highlighted box 
around on the battlefield and locate the target or destination for 
the warrior's action using the mouse or 'Alt' plus the arrow keys. 

4) Click the left mouse button or press 'Enter' to select the 
highlighted target or destination square. 

NOTE: If you choose an action that requires selection of a 
highlighted square, but you then change your mind and wish to choose 
a different warrior or action, click the right mouse button to exit 
the process and begin again. 

MOVE 
Warriors: All 
This action moves the warrior to a new square. When a warrior is 
moving it will not attack enemy warriors located near its course of 
travel, and defends itself poorly. Different warriors move at 
different speeds and expend different amounts of strength in moving. 

To move a selected warrior: 

1) Click the Move action tile; a highlight box is displayed on the 
battlefield. 

2) Move the box until it highlights the desired square. 

3) Press the left mouse button, or press 'Enter'. 

NOTE: Warriors do not move toward their destinations in a straight 
line. They move instead along the fastest path available. Remember 
that the lighter squares are the fastest to move over, the medium 
squares are a little slower, and the darkest squares are very slow. 

NOTE: If an enemy warrior is located in the new square, your warrior 
will attack upon arrival. 

INSPIRE 
Warriors: General only 
This action forces your General to stop moving and heal (give 
strength and health) all friendly non-Soldier warriors. To benefit 
from Inspire, warriors must be idle, and must be located in one of 
these positions: 

1) a straight horizontal path from the General's square, 2) a 
straight vertical path from the General's square, 3) a straight 
diagonal path from the General's square, or 4) a square adjacent to 
the General. 

SHIELD 
Warriors: General only 
In order to be shielded, warriors must be within two squares of 
being attached to the General but not necessarily adjacent to his 
square. Shielded warriors take only half the damage normally taken 
during combat. Shield costs the General strength. 

REST 
Warriors: All 
This action directs a warrior to attach to a supply line and Rest in 
order to regain strength, health, and supply. 

NOTE: Supply Tents must be in a supply line attached to the General 
in order to fully resupply. 

ENTRENCH 
Warriors; All except General 
This action directs the selected warrior to stop all other activity 
and build a safe hole in which to hide. Entrench takes a while to 
complete, but once the warrior is entrenched it will only take half 
of the damage normally inflicted during combat. 

NOTE: Large Warriors take longer to entrench than smaller   
warriors. Soldiers are the quickest and most successful, and     
supply tents are the slowest. 

LAY MINE                                 
Warriors: Soldier only 
Lat mine adds a mine to the current square, which turns a dark grey 
colour, any warrior, enemy or friendly, will he damaged by the mine 
upon entering the square. Up to sixteen mines may be laid on one 
square. Each mine in a square attacks a single warrior and is then 
used up. If another mine remains in the square, the next warrior to 
enter will take damage, until no more mines remain on the square, at 
which time the square will revert to a normal 
square.                      

To order a selected soldier to lay mineS: 

1) click the lay mine action tile; a highlight box is displayed on 
the batt1efie1d. 

2) move the box until it highlights the desired square. 

3) Press the left mouse button, or press Enter.

SWEEP MINE 
Warriors: Soldier only 
This action directs a warrior to remove all mines from all squares 
between their current square and a selected square. The soldier 
moves very slowly into the square without taking any damage, and 
begins eliminating mines. The Soldier continues to sweep mines until 
the square is free of mines or the soldier runs out of strength. 

To order a selected soldier to sweep for mines: 

Click the sweep mine action tile; a highlight box is displayed on 
the battlefield. 

Move the box until it highlights the desired square. 

Press the left mouse button, or press 'Enter'. 

SHOOT 
Warriors: gatling guns, tanks, Cannon 
This action directs a selected warrior to fire at a target range. 
Gatling guns fire an arc of projectiles. 

To target and Shoot for a Selected Warrior: 

1) Click the shoot action tile; a high1ight box is displayed On the 
batt1efie1d. 

Move the box until it highlights the desired target; 

Press the left mouse button, or press 'Enter'. 

Warriors who have used up all of their projectiles must enter 
Resupply mode adjacent to a supply tent to reload. If a warrior is 
ordered to launch, but has no projectiles, nothing wi11 happen. 

DEFEND 
Warriors: Gatling Guns, Tanks, Cannon 
Defend directs a warrior that is capable of shooting to protect an 
area within it's firing range. If an enemy enters a square within 
the warrior's range, it will target and shoot automatically every 
few seconds. Gatling Guns and Tanks fire multiple shots at any enemy 
warriors in their range. The Cannon only fires a single shot at a 
time. 

NOTE: Enemies that manage to move inside the shooting warrior's 
range will not be fired on. Also, moving warriors are harder to hit 
and take less damage than stationary warriors. 

RETREAT 
Warriors: All except General 
Retreat directs a warrior to attempt an escape toward the General. 
Movement is a bit faster than normal at a bit higher strength cost 
than normal. 

NOTE: The warrior will try to avoid getting into fights as it 
retreats. If it is attacked it won't fight back and will continue 
running. 

RESIGN 
Warriors: General only 
This action surrenders and quits the game. You have a few seconds to 
cancel the Resign command before it takes effect. 

Contemporary Set 
An abstraction of contemporary air warfare with a futuristic look. 
Includes aircraft, radar and stealth, projectile and missile 
weapons. Object is to take the enemy Base. 

All warriors except the base are normally invisible to the other 
player until a warrior comes within sighting range or a radar is 
turned on. Warriors are temporarily visible to the opposing player 
whenever they use their weapon. 

There are three ground types; desert, road, and airfield. Ground 
warriors move at different speeds through all the terrains, desert 
being the slowest, airfields the fastest. Aircraft may only land on 
and take off from airfields. 

WARRIORS 

Immediately following the title of each warrior is a list of actions 
available to that warrior. The actions for the warriors are 
explained in the following Actions section. 

A warrior may refuel from any tank or base in the supply line that 
has spare fuel. If the supply line includes the Base, repairs and 
ammunition may also be procured. 

BASE (1) 
Actions: Rest, Resign 
Losing the Base loses the game. Other warriors may recover energy, 
damage and ammunition here. It takes a few bomb hits or many missile 
and /or tank hits to destroy it. The base is visible to the enemy at 
all times, resting and healing at its fixed position. The Base can 
only see enemy warriors in the same square. 

TANK (5) 
Actions: Move, Rest, Shoot, Build, Destroy 
The Tank is used for ground attacks and building roads or landing 
strips. Tanks also carry fuel for refuelling the other warriors. 
Tanks move at normal speed and can only see enemy warriors in the 
same square, however they are visible to enemy warriors in adjacent 
squares. 

RADAR (2) 
Actions: Move, Rest, Radar, Scramble, AutoFire 
These warriors are the eyes of the player. Radar makes hard-to-see 
enemy airplanes visible. Radar controls targeting and launching of 
missiles and fighter aircraft and has control over all nearby 
Missile Launchers. 

All enemy warriors in the radar's range (ten squares) are visible 
when the Radar is on. When off, only enemies in the same square are 
visible. This warrior is visible to all enemies within the same 
radar range when the Radar is turned on. 

MISSILE LAUNCHER (4) 
Actions: Move, Rest, Shoot 
The Missile Launcher is used for defending important locations. 
Launched missiles are best against aircraft or tanks. A missile 
lander moves at normal speed, and can only see enemy warriors in its 
own square. 

FIGHTER (3) 
Actions: Move, Rest, Shoot, Escort, Hunt 
The Fighter is a very quick moving warrior, which fires missiles at 
opponents. It cannot be stationary while in flight, and may only 
land on an airfield square. If the Fighter runs out of energy while 
in flight it will try to land, crashing if not over an airfield. 
During movement, effects of terrain are ignored by this warrior. 

The Fighter can intercept and do battle, i.e. dog-fight, with an 
enemy Fighter. While flying it can see enemy warriors a few squares 
in front of it, and is visible to those same warriors. 

BOMBER (1) 
Actions: Move, Rest, Bomb, Home Base, Seek Base 
The Bomber is used primarily to destroy the enemy base. Uses rnore 
energy than a fighter to fly the same distance, and only carries a 
single bomb. 


ACTIONS
         
To make a warrior perform an action:
         
1 ) Select the warrior by clicking the mouse pointer on the warrior 
in any of the following locations: 

 Current battlefield view (front or overhead views) 
 Status screen 
 Warrior tile (at the bottom of every screen) 

2) Click the mouse pointer on the appropriate action tile. 

3) If necessary for the specific action, move the highlighted box 
around on the battlefield and locate the target or destination for 
the warrior's action using the mouse or 'Alt' plus the arrow keys. 

4) Click the left mouse button or press 'Enter' to select the 
highlighted target or destination square. 

NOTE: If you choose an action that requires selection of a 
highlighted square, but you then change your mind and wish to choose 
a different warrior or action, click the right mouse button to exit 
the process and begin again. 

MOVE 
Warriors: All except the Base 
This action moves the warrior to a new square. When a warrior is 
moving it will not attack enemy warriors located near its course of 
travel, and will defend itself poorly. Different warriors move at 
different speeds and expend different amounts of strength in moving, 
and aircraft ignore the effects of terrain while flying. 

To remove a selected warrior: 

1) Click the Move action tile; a destination square is highlighted 
on the battlefield. 

2) Move the square until it highlights the desired square. 

3) Press the left mouse button or press 'Enter'. 

NOTE: Warriors do not move toward their destinations in a straight 
line. They move along the fastest path available. Remember that the 
airfields are the fastest to move over, and the desert is very 
restrictive. 

REST 
Warriors: All 
Rests the selected warrior, allowing it to recover energy, and 
acquire ammunition. If the warrior is not in a supply line it will 
move to the nearest Tank or to the Base (energy allowing) before it 
starts to Rest. If the supply line includes the Base, damage may 
also be repaired. Aircraft simply land on the current square, and if 
it isn't an airfield, crash! 

RESIGN 
Warriors: Base only Surrenders and ends the game. 
You have a few seconds to cancel the Resign command if you change 
your mind. 

SHOOT 
Warriors: Fighter, Launcher, Tank 
Causes the selected warrior to shoot a projectile or missile at a 
target square. Range of the shot is dependent on the firing warrior. 
The firing warrior is visible to the enemy for a brief period. 

To have a selected warrior shoot:           

1) Click the Shoot action tile; a target square is highlighted on 1) 
the battlefield. 

2) Move the square until it highlights the desired target.  

3) Press the left mouse button or press 'Enter'.  

BUILD 
Warriors: Tank only 
Build causes the selected Tank to make a desert into a road and a 
road into an airfield. This does not affect airfield squares. This 
is a high energy use operation, and it would be wise to have a 
supply line set up. 

To have a selected Tank build: 

1) Click the Build action tile; a destination square is highlighted 
on the battlefield. 

2) Move the square until it highlights the desired square. 

3) Press the left mouse button or press 'Enter'. 

DESTROY 
Warriors: Tank only
Destroy causes the selected Tank to make an airfield into a road and 
a road into a desert. Doesn't affect desert squares. This is a high 
energy operation, and it would be wise to have a supply line set up. 

To have a selected warrior Destroy: 

Click the Destroy action tile; a destination square is highlighted 
on the battlefield. 

Move the square until it highlights the desired square. 

Press the left mouse button or press 'Enter'. 

NOTE: Shooting at an empty square has the same affect. 

RADAR ON/OFF 
Warriors: Radar only 
Turns on and off the Radar. On makes all enemy aircraft and Missile 
Launchers within range visible and the Radar more likely to be 
visible to the enemy. Consumes energy, and is turned off during 
movement. 

SCRAMBLE 
Warriors: Radar only 
Scrambles any Fighter planes within its influence. The aircraft take 
off and fly towards enemy warriors that the Radar can detect. Has an 
on/off mode button. 

You may wish to leave your fighters in Hunt mode so Scramble will 
cause them to follow the enemy warriors. 

AUTO FIRE 
Warriors: Radar only 
Another mode button. When on, an attached Missile Launcher will fire 
at warriors that the radar can detect. The launchers will continue 
to fire until this mode is turned off or the launchers run out of 
ammunition. Launchers running out of ammunition will rest until they 
have more and then resume the attack. 

ESCORT / HOME BASE 
Warriors: Fighter, Bomber 
Escort causes the selected Fighter to automatically follow the 
Bomber. This is used to provide fighter cover. If the Bomber lands, 
the Fighter will land on the same square. Escort causes the Bomber 
to head for its Base. 

HUNT / SEEK BASE 
Warriors: Fighter, Bomber 
Hunt causes the selected Fighter to follow the nearest visible enemy 
warrior. Preference is given to airborne warriors, and in particular 
the Bomber, for area defence. 

Hunt causes the Bomber to seek out the enemy Base. 

BOMB 
Warriors: Bomber only 
The Bomber has a firing range of a single square, so it must be 
immediately on or next to its target in order to score a hit. The 
Bomber carries a single bomb, and should take off near its target as 
it uses energy quickly. This is used primarily to destroy the enemy 
Base. 

To have Bomber drop a Bomb: 

1) Click the Bomb action tile; a target square is highlighted on the 
battlefield. 

2) Move the square until it highlights the desired target. 

3) Press the left mouse button or press 'Enter'. 

Multi-Player Games 
Theatre of War may be played by two players either on the same 
computer using turns, or in real-time using two computers hooked 
together via a serial connection. 

SAME MACHINE 
A two-player game is played in a series of turns. Player 1 has 60 
seconds to enter any number of moves he wishes. When his time 
expires, Player 2 has the same amount of time to enter his or her 
moves. 

After Player 2's time expires, Player 1 can proceed again. 

NOTE: The default time for each player's move is 60 seconds, but 
this can be altered during game start up. (See Starting The Game ). 

SERIAL CONNECTION 
In order to connect two computers together for serial connection 
games, a null modem cable is required. A serial printer cable should 
work fine, as long as it has the correct connectors for each 
computer. If you have a modem cable already, you can purchase a null 
modem adapter rather inexpensively at most electronic stores. You 
may also require a gender changer in order to get the correct 
connection for a computer on one side of the cable. 

After selecting a two player serial game, a 'chat box' and serial 
options dialogue will pop up. The chat box consists of a couple of 
text lines for each machine (e.g.. The top lines are for incoming 
text, the bottom lines for outgoing text.) The serial options box 
contains baud rate adjustment and "OK" and "CANCEL" buttons. If the 
player clicks the cancel button, the game returns to the main menu. 

NOTE: It is very important that you know the baud rate of the other 
machine, if you are connected via a serial cable, or the baud rate 
you will be connecting at if you are connecting via a modem. 

When a player types text, if the serial connection is good and the 
baud rate is set properly, the text being typed appears in the 
outgoing area of the chat box. This works whether two machines are 
hooked up directly with a null modem cable, or if the machine is 
hooked up to a modem. 

If the machine is hooked up to a modem, the player must initiate the 
connection to the other machine by typing ATD. Modems 
that have MNP or v.bis error correction or data compression can 
cause problems with real- time games. Please refer to your manual 
for instructions on how to disable all error correction and data 
compression. 

Once a connection is made (or if a null modem cable is used), the 
player should click the OK button. A dialogue box appears stating 
'Waiting for the other machine...' and containing a cancel button. 
When the other player clicks his OK button, and the connection 
between the machines is good, the game will proceed. If the 
connection is bad, both machines will just sit there waiting for the 
other one, and both players must click 'Cancel'. 

During the game, if either player pauses the game, both machines 
will be paused and the chat box pops up again so that the players 
can type messages to each other. 

SAVING & RESTORING GAMES 
Theatre of War allows you to save and restore games. Each saved game 
belongs to its specific warrior set and can not be loaded when 
another warrior set is selected. 

SAVING 
To save a game during play, press the 'Alt + S' key combination. 
Theatre of War asks you for a name to save the game under. This name 
can be up to eight (8) letters, and is used as the file name when 
saving the game to disk. 

RESTORING 
Restoring a game is equally simple, as saved games are restored in 
the same manner as starting a new one. Each of your saved games will 
be displayed with either the scenarios (if you saved a computer 
scenario game) or the boards (if you saved a two player game) and 
you can select it just as you would a new game. Refer to the Main 
Menu section for specifics on starting a game. 

SHARING 
A saved game can be shared by copying the saved game file from one 
Theatre of War game to another. Saved games for each warrior set are 
stored in the directory for that warrior set. These are located 
inside the Theatre of War directory. The first three sets's 
directories are named: 

         T1 -Medieval Set 
         T2 -Great War Set 
         T3 -Contemporary Set 

TROUBLE SHOOTING 
Theatre of War is a very sophisticated game, which is a fancy way of 
saying a lot can go wrong. The following paragraphs, along with the 
Three-Sixty Trouble Shooting Guide included in this package will 
hopefully solve your problems. 

UNABLE TO USE SUPER VGA 
Theatre of War requires a Super VGA card and a VESA driver for that 
card in order to work in Hi-res. The installation program will try 
to install the correct driver for your card, but with so many cards 
out it my not succeed. If not, you will need to provide a driver. 
One should be on the floppy disk supplied with your card. 

NO SOUND OR MUSIC 
We support the AdLib, SoundBlaster and SoundBlaster Pro sound cards. 
To hear the music or sound effects, you must select the correct 
sound card during installation. 

GAME DOESN'T RUN 
Theatre of War requires 560K of main memory. DOS 5.0 is recommended, 
and should be loaded hi. EMS or XMS is required for Super VGA, and 
an appropriate driver be loaded. See the Trouble Shooting Guide for 
more help. 

Keyboard Equivalents 
Esc .......... exit to menu screen 
Up arrow ..... scroll map up 
Down arrow ... scroll map down 
Left arrow ... scroll map left 
Right arrow .. scroll map right 
P ............ 3-D perspective view 
O ............ overhead view 
PgUp ......... zoom in (or + on num. pad) 
PgDn ......... zoom out (or - on num. pad) 
C ............ centre map on selected warrior 
I ............ information screen toggle 
U ............ toggle friendly/enemy info 
F1 ........... warp speed 1 
F2 ........... warp speed 2 
F3 ........... warp speed 3 
F4 ........... warp speed 4 
R ............ retreat all men 
M ............ music toggle (on/off) 
N ............ toggle sound effects 
F ............ force other player (1 or 2) 
Space ........ Pause game 
ALT + S ...... Save current game 
F5 (or Q) .... action 1 for selected warrior 
F6 (or W) .... action 2 
F7 (or E) .... action 3 
F8 (or A) .... action 4 
F9 (or S) ...  action 5 
F10 (or Z) .. .action 6 
Enter .......  ....execute selected action 
Del..........  ....cancel selected action 

Selecting a destination square for an action: 

Alt .........  +Up Arrow moves up one square 
Alt .........  +Down Arrow moves down one square 
Alt .........  +Left Arrow moves left one square 
Alt .........  +Right Arrow moves right one square 

These keys select specific warriors, corresponding to the 
warrior tiles at the bottom of the screen: 

K, ',1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0, -, =, Backspace, \ 

Tab .........  ....select the next warrior 
Caps Lock ...  ....select previous warrior 

Modem Information 
America Online: ThreeSixty 
CompuServe: 7611,240 
GEnie: THREE-SIXTY 
Internet: 76711.240 COMPUSERVE.COM 

Technical Support 
If you have any queries about this product, Electronic Arts' 
Customer Service Department can help. If your question isn't urgent, 
please write to us at: 

Electronic Arts Customer Service, P.O. Box 835, Slough, Berkshire, 
England. SL3 8XU. 

Please be sure to include the following information in your letter.

 Type and model of computer you own 
 Any additional system information (e.g. make and model of printer, 
hard disk, video card/ display etc) 
 Type of operating system or DOS version number 
 Full description of the problem 

If you need to talk to someone immediately, call us on (0753) 546465 
Monday to Friday during normal business hours. Please have the above 
information ready when you call. This will help us answer your 
question in the shortest possible time. 

Theatre of War

Strategy and Conquest in Real-Time

Trouble Shooting and Installation Instructions

Hard Drive Installation 
The installation program will unpack the Theatre of War program and 
data files, and configure the game for your video and sound 
capabilities. The following instructions assume that A: is the 
floppy drive you will be inserting the Theatre of War disks in, and 
C: is the destination Hard drive. Be sure to use the appropriate 
designations below if you are using drives other than A; or C: for 
this installation. 

To run the installation program, insert disk 1 in the A: drive and 
type the following from the DOS prompt: 

A: 

INSTALL C:\TWAR 

You will be asked to insert Disk 2 in the A drive during the 
installation. When finished, Theatre of War will be installed on C: 
in the sub directory TWAR. Change the command line appropriately if 
you wish to use a different drive or sub directory. 

Playing Theatre of War To play a game, enter the Theatre of War sub 
directory and type: 

TWAR 

Configuring Theatre of War 

After installing Theatre of War, you can change some of its 
operations in the 'Options' screen at the Main Menu. However, if you 
add a sound card or upgrade to a super VGA graphics adapter you will 
need to re configure Theatre of War. To do this, enter the Theatre 
of War sub directory and type: 

CONFIG 

This program will take you through the same process as when you 
installed Theatre of War. Here you can let the program know which 
sound card you have, and select the best video mode your VGA adapter 
supports. 

Memory usage and hints Theatre of War requires 640K to operate in 
320x200x256 colour mode and 2Mb to operate in 640x480x256 Super VGA 
mode. Obtaining memory for either mode is made easier by running DOS 
5 and a memory manager such as EMM386 or QEMM 

An unfortunate limitation of MS-DOS is that programs are limited to 
a maximum of 640K of base memory. Memory above this is referred to 
as either (XMS) or expanded (EMS) memory. Theatre of War will make 
use of either of these protocols: however expanded (EMS) is 
preferable as game play is much faster. (NOTE: actual memory 
requirements are approximately: 500K for all configurations, 500K of 
EMS/XMS for 640x400, 610K of EMS/XMS for 640x480 & 40K more EMS/XMS 
for digitised sound in hi res. 

Refer to the Three-Sixty Trouble Shooting Guide for specific help in 
obtaining more memory. 

READ.ME file on disk: 

It is very important that you read the file READ.ME on disk 1 ! To 
do so from the A:>, type: 

TYPE READ.ME | MORE 

Three-Sixty Troubleshooting Guide 

This guide is designed to aid you in setting up your computer to 
maximise the amount of memory available to programs. Many 
Three-Sixty products are extremely complex programs and require more 
conventional memory than a "typical" PC system configuration may 
provide. While a typical IBM computer will have up to two megabytes 
or more of RAM, not all of this memory is directly available to 
programs. MS-DOS will normally allow programs to access a maximum of 
640K of RAM for executable code, regardless of how much RAM is 
actually present in the computer. 

Obtaining More Memory If your computer's configuration loads many 
memory resident programs (also known as TSRs) and/or drivers (for a 
disk cache, RAM drive, etc.) then it is likely that the remaining 
unused base memory will not be enough to allow more complex programs 
to run. It is possible to free up more base memory and allow your 
computer to use larger programs by optimising your CONFIG.SYS and 
AUTOEXEC.BAT files. In addition, setting up your CONFIG.SYS file 
properly can provide more extended memory and expanded memory which 
can make some programs run faster and smoother. 

If you have a 286, 386, or 486-based PC then you should use MS-DOS 5.
0 or later. MS-DOS 5.0 will allow you to load part of DOS plus some 
TSRs and drivers into upper memory. This will free more base memory 
for program use. If you have switched to MS-DOS 5.0 and still do not 
have enough memory to run larger programs, you should check your 
CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files to free more conventional memory. 

NOTE: If you are using a memory manager other than the one that came 
with DOS, please refer to the documentation for that product to 
determine how to set up your CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files for 
the maximum free base memory. 

Modifying CONFIG.SYS 

For your CONFIG.SYS file under MS-DOS 5.0: 

The first driver loaded in your CONFIG.SYS file should be HIMEM.SYS. 
The line should look something like: 

         DEVICE=C: \DOS\HIMEM.SYS 

The HIMEM.SYS file may be in your Windows directory, if you have 
one. 

Ensure that there is a line in your CONFIG.SYS file reading either: 

DOS=HIGH 

or 

DOS=HIGH,UMB 

This will load DOS into high memory for more free base memory. 

If you are using a 386 or 486 computer, install EMM386 by including: 

DEVICE=C:\DOS\EMM386.EXE 768 RAM 

in your CONFIG.SYS file. (The EMM386.EXE file might be in your 
Windows directory, if you have one.) 

Change any lines not mentioned above which read like: 

DEVICE=. . . 

to read: 

DEVICEHIGH=. . . 

If you have a line in your CONFIG.SYS file which reads 

BUFFERS=# 

(where # is some number), make sure the value for # is less than 50. 

If you have a line in your CONFIG.SYS file which reads 

FILES= # 

(where # is some number) and # is greater than 30, make sure you are 
using a program which actually requires that number of open files, 
like word processors or database programs. If you are not using any 
programs which require a large number of open files, you should 
replace # with a more reasonable value (like 20 or 30). 

Modifying AUTOEXEC.BAT Make sure you are not loading an excess of 
memory resident programs. Lines begirming with SET, PATH, or PROMPT 
do not take up basic memory, but any other lines in the AUTOEXEC.BAT 
file rnight be loading TSRs. If you know what these are and require 
them to be in memory at all times, try adding the command LOADHIGH 
to the beginning of the line which loads the TSR. If you are using a 
separate commercial memory manager then consult the documentation 
for that product to determine how to load TSR programs into high 
memory. 

Make sure you aren't loading any DOS shell or menu program. These 
take up base memory, and scme can also cause problems with larger 
programs. Ensure you are only loading a mouse driver (if you have a 
mouse) and are not loading mouse utilities as well. Typically, the 
mouse driver should be loaded with a single command line, sometimes 
as DEVICEHIGH=MOUSE.SYS in your CONFIG.SYS file, but usually as 
LOADHIGH MOUSE 

In your AUTOEXEC.BAT file. Many brands of mouse drivers also include 
TSR utilities for various functions. It is important that these 
utilities are not loaded. They take up precious base memory and may 
cause problems similar to those of some DOS shells. 

Boot Disk 

If you have TSRs or drivers which will not load into high memory or 
do not wish to change your system configuration for some reason, you 
can create a boot disk. This will allow you to run more complex 
programs by starting up your system from a floppy disk instead of 
your hard drive. You will still be able to run programs which are 
located on the hard drive, but the configuration information will be 
taken from the boot disk and not the hard drive. This provides all 
the advantages of modifying your CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT files 
without having to modify those files on your hard drive. 

DOS 5.0 

The following instructions assume that your DOS subdirectory is 
C:\DOS. If your DOS subdirectory is something else, replace all 
occurrences of C:\DOS in the following instructions with your 
correct DOS subdirectory. For DOS 3.0 or 4.0, see page 7. 

To create a boot disk, start by g~tting a disk of the same type as 
your "An drive. For example, if you have a 5.25" high density drive 
for your "A" drive, get a 5.25" 1.2 MB disk. If you have a 3.5" 720K 
drive as your "A" drive, get a 3.5" 720K disk. Place this disk in 
your "A" drive and enter the command: 

FORMAT A: /S /U 

When the disk is finished formatting, enter the command: 

COPY CON A:\CONFIG.SYS 

You should see a flashing cursor; the system is waiting for you to 
enter the contents of your new CONFIG.SYS file. Type the following 
lines: 

         DEVICE=C:\DOS\HIMEM.SYS 
         DOS=HIGH,UMB 
         DEVICE=C:\DoS\EMM386.EXE 768 RAM 

If your system has several megabytes of memory and you are not 
running a third party disk cache, then you might consider adding the 
line: 

         DEVICEHIGH=C:!DOS\SMARTDRV.SYS 

This line adds a disk cache in extended memory which will speed up 
disk access and make programs which read information from the hard 
drive run faster. If you do not have several megabytes of extended 
memory then you should not enter this command. 

If the file for your mouse driver is MOUSE.SYS then you should enter 
the line: 

         DEVICEHIGH=C: \DOS\MOUSE.SYS 

This assumes that your mouse driver is located in the DOS 
subdirectory on your hard drive. If the mouse driver is located 
somewhere else, either copy it to the DOS subdirectory or change 
"DOS" in above line to reflect the correct subdirectory. 

If you are using a real-time software compression driver on your 
hard drive to increase available storage space, you must add a line 
to your CONFIG.SYS to install this driver. Three-Sixty does not 
recommend the use of such a driver as they can cause hard-to-detect 
problems with some programs. Please consult the documentation for 
your compression software for the proper command line to enter into 
your CONFIG.SYS file. 

Once you have entered all these lines, press the  key. This will 
display AZ on the screen. Now press the  key and you should 
see the message: 

         1 file(s) copied 

This saves your new CONFIG.SYS file to the disk. 

Once you have created a new CONFIG.SYS file, create a new AUTOEXEC.
BAT file for your boot disk. To do this, enter the command: 

         COPY CON A:\AUTOEXEC.BAT 

You should see a flashing cursor; the system is waiting for you to 
enter the contents of your new AUTOEXEC.BAT file. Enter the 
following lines: 

         PROMPT $P$G 
         PATH C:\jC:\DOS 

If your mouse driver is MOUSE.COM or some similarly named file (and 
not MOUSE.SYS, which would have been loaded earlier in the CONFIG.
SYS file), then enter the command to load your mouse driver by 
typing: 

         LOADHIGH C:\DOS\MOUSE.COM 

If your mouse driver is not named MOUSE.COM, then you need to 
replace "MOUSE.COM" with the name of your mouse driver. Also, if 
your mouse driver is not in your DOS subdirectory, you need to 
replace "DOS" in the command above with name of the directory 
containing your mouse driver. Altematively, you can copy the mouse 
driver to your boot disk and replace the above line with the 
command: 

         LOADHIGH MOUSE.COM 

(or whatever the file for the mouse driver is called). enter the 
command to activate your VESA driver by typing: 

         LOADHIGH TSENG.COM 

If the file name of the VESA driver for your video adapter is not 
TSENG.COM, replace "TSENG.COM" in the above line with the correct 
file name for your VESA driver. 

Once you have entered these lines, Press the  key. This causes 
^Z to be displayed. Press the key and you should see the 
message: 

         1 file(s) copied 

This saves your new AUTOEXEC.BAT file to the disk. Your boot disk is 
now complete. 

In order to use your new boot disk to increase your system memory, 
insert the disk into your "A" drive and reset your computer. When 
your computer has finished booting up, you should see: 

         A> 

displayed on the screen. You can then switch to your hard drive to 
run any program with large memory requirements. 

If you need assistance in creating a boot disk or reconfiguring your 
system to provide more memory, you can call the Electronic Arts 
Customer Service Line at (0753) 546465 during normal business hours, 
Monday through Friday. Please call while sitting at your machine so 
that we can check your system's configuration for problems. If you 
cannot call while near your machine, have a complete system 
description along with copies of your CONFIG.SYS and AUTOEXEC.BAT 
files so that we can determine what is causing any problems which 
you may be experiencing. 

DOS 3.0 & 4.0 

If you are running MS-DOS versions 3 or 4 and do not have enough 
memory available to run Three- Sixty software, we recommend that you 
create a boot disk. Three-Sixty recommends the use of DOS 5.0 or 
later. Instructions for DOS 5.0 are on page 5. 

Obtain a floppy disk which works in your "A" drive. For example, if 
you have a 5.25" high-density drive as your "A" drive, get a 5.25" 1.
2M high-density disk. If you have a 3.5" high-density drive as your 
"A" drive, get a 3.5" 1.44M high-density disk. Place this disk in 
your "A" drive and enter the command: 

         FORMAT A: /S 

Wait for the disk to finish formatting. If you are using a 
commercial memory manager and/or the file for your mouse driver is 
MOUSE.SYS, you must create CONFIG.SYS file which activates them. 
Enter the following: 

         COPY CON A:\CONFIG.SYS 

You should see a flashing cursor; the system is waiting for you to 
enter the contents of you new CONFIG.SYS file. Consult your memory 
manager documentation if necessary, and enter the appropriate 
DEVICE= line to activate it. 

If the file for your mouse driver is MOUSE.SYS then enter the line: 

         DEVICE=C: \DOS\MOUSE.SYS 

This assumes that your mouse driver is loaded in the DOS 
subdirectory of your hard drive. If the mouse driver is located 
elsewhere, either copy it to the DOS subdirectory or change "DOS" in 
the above line to reflect the correct subdirectory. 

When the last command has been entered, press the  key and you 
should see the message: 

         1 file(s) copied 

This saves your new CONFIG.SYS file to the disk. 

Once you have completed a new CONFIG.SYS file (if you needed one), 
create a new AUTOEXEC.BAT file for your boot disk. .To do this, 
enter: 

         COPY CON A:\AUTOEXEC.BAT 

You should see a flashing cursor as the system waits for you to 
enter the commands to go into the AUTOEXEC.BAT file. Enter the 
following line: 

         PROMPT $P$G 
         PATH C:\;C:\DOS 

If your mouse driver is MOUSE.COM or MOUSE.EXE (and not MOUSE.SYS, 
which would have been loaded earlier in the CONFIG.SYS file), then 
enter the command to load your mouse driver by typing: 

         MOUSE 

If your mouse driver is not named MOUSE.COM or MOUSE.EXE, then you 
need to replace "MOUSE" with the correct name of your mouse driver. 
Also, if your mouse driver is not in your path, either copy it to 
the DOS directory or to the root directory of your hard drive. 

Enter the command to activate your VESA driver by typing: 

         TSENG 

If the file name of the VESA driver for your video adapter is not 
TSENG.COM, replace "TSENG" in the above line with the correct file 
name for your VESA driver. 

Once you have entered these lines, press the  key. This should 
cause "Z to be displayed. Then press the  key and you should 
see the message: 

1 file(s) copied 

This saves your new AUTOEXEC.BAT file to the disk. Your boot disk is 
complete. 

In order to use your new boot disk to increase your system memory, 
insert the disk into your "A" drive and reset your computer. When 
the computer is ready you will see: 

         A> 

displayed on the screen. You can then switch to your hard drive to 
run programs. 

Super VGA and VESA Many of the newest software programs will run in 
video modes which offer either higher resolutions or more colours 
than is supported by the standard VGA graphics resolution. For 
example, standard VGA supports 320 x 200 with 256 colours or 640 x 
480 with 16 colours. Many new Three-Sixty products use Super VGA 640 
x 480 with 256 colours. 

There is no current hardware standard for such improved graphics 
modes, so Three-Sixty, along with other leaders in the entertainment 
software industry, has decided to adopt a software standard instead. 
This allows our new programs to work on a variety of video adapters 
from different hardware manufacturers. The software standard is 
known as the VESA standard, for Video Electronics Standards 
Association. The VESA concept allows a memory resident driver to be 
loaded, providing a standard software interface for communicating 
with different video adapters--each of which supports the same 
graphics resolutions in different ways. This means that one program 
can be used with an assortment of different video adapters. 

Since there is no current hardware standard, each video adapter may 
require a unique VESA driver to allow programs to access the various 
extended VESA graphics modes. Until a hardware standard for Super 
VGA emerges, the VESA standard is the only practical method for 
utilising the greater graphics resolution and larger number of 
colours available with Super VGA. 

For most of its new products, Three-Sixty has decided to use either 
the 640 x 480 Super VGA mode or the 640 x 400 Super VGA mode. Both 
modes provide 256 colours. These modes were chosen because a 512K 
VESA compatible VGA adapter can display these modes on a normal VGA 
monitor, eliminating the expense of a new monitor for many users and 
allowing our Super VGA products to appeal to a wider audience. In 
fact, the 640 x 400 mode works on most (but not all) brands of 256K 
VGA adapters. 

Our installation process will attempt to determine which type of VGA 
adapter your system uses and load the proper VESA driver. In the 
unlikely event that your adapter is not recognised, it might be 
necessary for you to install a VESA driver which is compatible with 
your system. 

If the installation process fails, either your video system is not 
compatible with the required Super VGA modes or the installation 
routine was not able to recognise your VGA adapter. If your video 
adapter is Super VGA-capable, you may still be able to run programs 
utilising Super VGA graphics. To do this, you will have to install a 
VESA driver manually. 

Locating a VESA Driver If your video adapter came with a utilities 
disk, you should examine that disk to see if a VESA driver was 
included. Many video adapters include VESA drivers, and hardware 
manufacturers typically provide them at little or no charge. If your 
video adapter did not include a VESA driver, try contacting your 
hardware dealer or the adapter manufacturer to obtain one. 

If you still haven't found the right VESA driver and your video card 
uses the same chip set as a video card which has a VESA driver, you 
might be able to use that driver with your card. First, you will 
need to determine which chip set your video adapter uses. 

When some computers first start up, several messages are displayed. 
The first message (if it appears at all) usually displays the type 
of VGA adapter installed in the system. If this message is not 
displayed, you can either contact your hardware dealer to determine 
what type of video adapter is in your system, or if you feel 
comfortable with opening your system, you can usually tell what type 
of video adapter you have by physically examining it. Almost all 
adapters will have one or more large integrated circuits on the 
video board which bear a copyright message, often including the name 
of the chip set manufacturer. 

Once you have determined which chip set your video adapter uses, 
loading the appropriate VESA driver is easy. For example, if you 
determined that your video adapter uses a Tseng Laboratories ET- 
4000 chip set, simply run the TSENG.COM program found in the 
"DRIVERS" subdirectory of the program directory. 

Once this VESA driver is loaded into memory, you should be able to 
run any program which utilises the enhanced resolution and colour of 
Super VGA--as long as your video adapter and monitor support the 
required Super VGA modes. 

Test your VESA driver and memory configuration by running the CONFIG.
EXE utility in the program subdirectory. 

If you cannot locate a VESA driver which will work with your system 
and your video adapter documentation states that Super VGA modes are 
supported, please call the Electronic Arts Customer Service Line at 
(0753) 546465 during normal business hours, Monday through Friday. 
When calling, please have all program disks and documentation 
nearby, as well as any software and documentation which you may have 
for your video adapter. 

AdLib Problems 
While playing Theatre of War with the AdLib sound option, 
occasionally the sound may become 'garbled'. Should this happen, the 
system is likely to lock up shortly thereafter. This can be avoided 
by turning the sound on and off. To do so, press the 'M' key twice 
after hearing garbled sound. 

Mouse & COM Port Confusion 
If you are using a serial port mouse and specify that the serial two 
player game uses that port for the remote link, the mouse will stop 
working when you try to play a remote link game. You will also see 
lots of meaningless text in the serial chat box. That text is 
produced by the mouse whenever you move it. 

You can attempt to switch to the other COM port by using the 
keyboard in this situation. However, the switch might be 
unsuccessful if your computer uses certain mouse drivers. In that 
case, reboot the computer and change the default COM port by either 
running Theater of War's CONFIG.EXE or by editing the TWAR.BAT file 
(details in the command line parameters section of the ReadMe file). 

Great War Warrior Set 
The supply lines are similar to the ones in the Medieval Warrior Set 
except that they start at the general or at a supply tent. The 
general can recover strength and health on its own. The supply tents 
can only recover from the general. Everything else can recover from 
either the general or a supply tent. If you watch the information 
screen (the one that shows bar graphs for all the men), you will see 
strength and health being transferred from the supplier to the 
recovering unit. One catch is that when the general or supply tent 
runs low on strength or health, units resupplying from it stop 
resupplying. 

Contemporary Warrlor Set                       
After noticing the R command in the manual we  Driver decided to add 
a retreat command to the third warrior set so that the R keystroke 
would do   EMS something. All the pieces have a new action button 
(the dog running away icon) that makes the piece retreat. Pressing R 
on the keyboard makes all pieces retreat. 

For most pieces, the retreat makes the piece move to the base. Using 
retreat while the piece is at the base makes it go into recover 
mode. Pressing the base's retreatbutton sounds a general recall 
which makes all pieces retreat. The base repeatedly sounds the 
recall about once every five seconds until it either   VESA runs out 
of strength or you cancel it.

Glossery of Terms

Driver   Software which allows use of a hardware device. Often 
         called a device driver. 

EMS      Expanded Memory, the faster of the upper memory access 
         protocols. 

RAM      (Random Access Memory) Amount of storage available to 
          programs running on your computer. 

TSR      Terminate and Stay Resident software. Used primarily to 
         provide additional functionality to DOS or provide support 
         for hardware. Drivers are often TSRs. 

VESA     Video Electronics Standards Association standard for Super 
         VGA access. 

XMS      Extended Memory, the slower of the upper memory protocols 
         available.
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